Tag Archives: people

No Power

I ended up working today. Usually, we’re off, but it was part of the agreement the company made with the business we are supporting.

I worked one store and was asked to work another. The part-timer working that one had a family emergency. No problem.

Well, there was a problem. I was able to work about two hours at the other store, and then the power went out.

There was an accident several miles up the road. The power was out for about five miles when I was heading home.


And that sets the scene.

Instead of leaving right away, I called the boss and asked what he wanted me to do. I’ve worked inside Walmart several times when the power was out, but they have skylights, the stores do not. You can’t get a whole lot done in the dark, not at work anyway.

As I was waiting, I stood at one of the doors with the employees to tell people the store was closed; you can’t come in, no the gas pumps don’t work, no they can’t tell you anything, etc.

People talk about preparation for disasters all the time. They tell you to get food and water. They tell you to get things you will need during a disaster. They tell you to be able to defend yourself.

Some excellent advice is to learn to speak to people. Get some manners. Be amiable.

There are going to be things you want and need should we ever have a societal collapse. There are going to be people you can’t take from by force. There is going to be a need to be civil and barter for things you desperately need.

I got told to go F myself several times while nicely telling folk that the store was closed.

Sweet little old ladies shouldn’t use language like that.

That’s it. That’s the post.

Seegars

Change The World (or Do A Kindness)

We went to a little Italian place tonight and I couldn’t finish the small pizza I ordered. I knew this when I ordered but wanted a Hawaiian pizza.

(Stop here for a moment. This isn’t about you not liking pineapple on your pizza. It’s not that I don’t care, I can’t. I love pineapple and ham on a pizza. It’s perfection.)

The waitress asked me if I had a problem with the food. I told her no, I was full and we’d had a late lunch. We’ve never had a bad meal or service at that restaurant. She said I might be a blessing in disguise because one of the boys that worked in the kitchen was hungry and had no money to eat.

Okay, I heard one of the boys in the back was angry. The waitress had walked away and I looked at the wife and said said, β€œDid they do something to my pizza?”

She told me the waitress said hungry not angry. I felt something push me up out my chair and went to find the waitress. Reached in my pocket and pulled out a twenty and told the waitress to put it in the boys pocket, just make sure he got it.

It doesn’t matter how bad you got it someone else has it worse. I was wasting food someone else would gladly take. I would have spent that twenty on something stupid most likely. He’ll eat another meal or two.

I’m blessed. Beyond measure. What I have is fantastic. I surely hope I never receive what I deserve.

I got friends, family, a decent job and food in my belly. My kids want for nothing and have a roof over their heads. And they are loved just like the rest of my friends and family.

Count your blessings.

(This ain’t tooting my own horn or nothing. Go out and do nice things for people that can’t do anything for you so that they in turn may do nice things for others. It’s one of the only ways we’ll change this world.)