Tag Archives: history

The Final kNight

This was the last big show of the year. It’s my opinion, and it’s incredibly personal to me, so it’s most definitely skewed is that this show would have won one of those medals up for grabs at state.

I haven’t had the opportunity to see the entire show. I was sick for a bit and missed a couple of Saturday’s. Then the wide was sick.

Then the band had several kids down and sick with covid, and others were quarantined due to close contact so they had to miss state competitions.

The only regret I feel is for the seniors. They lost two years out of this with the tornado and covid.

But they all came across as supportive of the younger kids and told them how impressed they were and happy that they all came together. They’re family.

All in all, not a bad year.

Sometimes you can’t count wins in trophies and medals.

These kids are the North Central Silver Knights Marching Band. Two of them are mine by blood, and my wife has pretty much adopted the rest of them. By no fault of my own, I have a lot of kids I watch over in a way. And I could not be prouder.

That’s it. That’s the post.

Seegars

Time Slips Away


It doesn’t take long to stop and enjoy what you happen to enjoy in life. It’s really only stopping for five minutes and taking in what’s around you. I don’t take my camera out of the bag enough; I’m guilty of looking straight down the road and only focusing on the destination as of late when I should be taking time to enjoy the journey.


There’s so much to see and I forget sometimes that I have to work for a living; I am a husband and father, and those come first. And I like my job and love my family.


But what I do, not best and not what I enjoy most, what’s at my core and gives me peace and alone time is this:

Just wandering and exploring and watching the revival of this and destruction of that. I’m an observer; I keep the record so that others might see what we were and what we are to become.

That’s it. That’s the post.

Seegars

Cracked Sideview

I took this pic several years ago somewhere in the mountains. It was an old truck at a recycled house parts place. Neat place, neat truck.

Things in the rearview look remarkably different from what they looked like coming at you head-on.

You have time to reflect, no pun intended, and you see things and people for what they are.

Life changes and so will you. And the changes keep coming faster and faster.

Somehow you get slower and get an almost outside view of what’s going on; if you pay attention.

Time almost seems to stand still.

One of the benefits of age, I suppose.


Where did that come from? Weird.


That’s it. That’s the post.

Seegars

British Soil In North Carolina

There are a couple of small plots of British soil on the Outer Banks of North Carolina.

I hope to visit there someday.

Here’s a bit from cntraveler.com:

Because the U.S. had no anti-submarine patrol, the British Royal Navy sent 24 ships to safeguard shipping along the eastern seaboard. On May 12, 1942, the HMS Bedfordshire was struck by a German torpedo and went down with all hands. Citizens of Ocracoke, the tiny Outer Banks island where Blackbeard the pirate had died in 1718, buried four British sailors whose bodies had washed ashore. Over on neighboring Hatteras Island, locals had quietly buried a British sailor from the SS San Delfino near the Buxton Lighthouse the month before. A fifth Bedfordshire crewman was laid to rest by his side when his body was discovered a few days later.

The rest of the story (or the Paul Harvey of it for those of you old enough to remember) is here.

That’s it. That’s the post.

Seegars

Broken Arrow

Not very far from me there was an incident in the late 50s that could have been disastrous for a large portion of the southeast.

I was talking to a friend last night about a the misplacement of some C-4 in a news article. I mentioned to him that he’d be surprised how often ammo and such things do get misplaced as I’ve had to help find grenades before on a range.

Florence, SC

But what this piece is about is something much worse. Something, I’m fairly certain, you can’t put the pin back in.


On March 11, 1958, a U.S. Air Force Boeing B-47E-LM Stratojet from Hunter Air Force Base operated by the 375th Bombardment Squadron of the 308th Bombardment Wing near Savannah, Georgia, took off at approximately 4:34 PM and was scheduled to fly to the United Kingdom and then to North Africa as part of Operation Snow Flurry.

The aircraft was carrying nuclear weapons on board in the event of war with the Soviet Union breaking out. Air Force Captain Bruce Kulka, who was the navigator and bombardier, was summoned to the bomb bay area after the captain of the aircraft, Captain Earl Koehler, had encountered a fault light in the cockpit indicating that the bomb harness locking pin did not engage. As Kulka reached around the bomb to pull himself up, he mistakenly grabbed the emergency release pin. The Mark 6 nuclear bomb dropped to the bomb bay doors of the B-47 and the weight forced the doors open, sending the bomb 15,000 ft (4,600 m) down to the ground below.

Two sisters, six-year-old Helen and nine-year-old Frances Gregg, along with their nine-year-old cousin Ella Davies, were playing 200 yards (180 m) from a playhouse in the woods that had been built for them by their father Walter Gregg, who had served as a paratrooper during World War II. The playhouse was struck by the bomb. Its conventional high explosives detonated, destroying the playhouse, and leaving a crater about 70 feet (21 m) wide and 35 feet (11 m) deep. Fortunately, the fissile nuclear core was stored elsewhere on the aircraft.

All three girls were injured by the explosion, as were Walter, his wife Effie and son Walter, Jr. Seven nearby buildings were damaged. The United States Air Force (USAF) was sued by the family of the victims, who received US$54,000, equivalent to $478,526 in 2019.

The incident made domestic and international headlines.

Wikipedia


And if this had actually detonated I would not have even been a thought in either of my parents minds. They were both approximately ten years old at the time.

That’s not the only Broken Arrow story from the southeast. Check them out.

That’s it. That’s the post.

Seegars

Knights To Nomads: Interlude

So we’re at a stall in the story. Nothing going on at all out on site this week. I have reached out to the Kershaw County School District to try and find out if I should get a picture of what it’s going to look like, or a peek at the plans. So today I strung together some of the old footage and included a short flyby of where were at today. Enjoy.

A lot of wind today and I think I have a warped propeller on the drone so that needs looking into.

Seegars

Knights To Nomads: Part 9

I was lucky to get video today because the higher I got the more wind warnings I received. But I went on because, let’s face it, I’m not that smart.

The demolition has continued on and they’re coming up into the locker rooms at the old gym. When the gym falls this week (I’m supposing it will happen this week) the original Castle will be gone.

I noticed that the old slab floors are being torn out. This means a whole new footprint. I would LOVE to see the plans for the new school!

Anyway, you didn’t come here to read my ramblings.

Here’s the vid.

(Sorry about the volume this week. It was a quick edit and forgot about the volume.)

Seegars

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