Truck Stuff: Baby It’s Cold Outside

Well, it ain’t too cold yet, but the mornings are a bit chilly. Riding along in a truck with no heat, fogging up the windows until you get a balance between cracked window air and inside air, is a challenge.

I’m going to give 1A Auto a shout out tonight because I will always go to them first when I’m looking to do something mechanical or otherwise with Bruce.

This is a basic heater core flush and isn’t even the correct video for my truck but I have done this before and needed to refresh my memory.

DIY Pro Tip: If you’re gonna go to YouTube looking for answers, watch a couple of different content providers and see what works and what doesn’t.

Start with something simple. Believe me; even the pros won’t have all the answers you’re looking for online.

Just because they say this is what your vehicle should have, it may not. Keep looking.

Find someone that you’re comfortable with following their instructions.


I called around before doing this, and I got some prices that were outrageous to me on something so simple.

As I’ve mentioned before I also have the best shade tree mechanic in three counties for a father, and sometimes you gotta let the old man help to make him feel useful.

He thought there was a problem with the heater control valve.

He thought it wasn’t working, so he learned something today. That valve opens when the fan control is turned on, closes when turned off.

Heater Control Valve

Not all cars, even from the same manufacturer, are made the same. But you’d be amazed how much crossover there is in a lot of parts and interior/exterior body parts and pieces.

Mazda B-2000/Older Ford Rangers for example. This is a pretty good article explaining a lot of that.


Bruce is a pretty basic truck mechanically. I know where my limit is, and I keep pushing it every time.

Sooner or later, I’ll have a completely rebuilt engine if I keep going like this.

Heater core flushes are pretty basic affairs. I have heat. I had to write tonight, and this is what happened today.

You guys and gals that want to DIY you can do it. You are going to mess up. You are going to buy the wrong part. You may even screw up a major part. But don’t let that stop you.

I still remember almost crapping my pants when I didn’t really know about the firing sequence when I did a tune-up. Things happen.

Learn from your mistakes and pass the knowledge and the errors on—everything you do wrong is a learning experience.

That’s it. That’s the post.

Seegars

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